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Artists

Hirst: “You Can’t Make Art” Without Money

By | Art Advisory, Art and Design, Art Auctions, Art Collections, Art Market, Artists, News
Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons at the Newport Street Gallery, London. Photo: Newport Street Gallery, London via Facebook

Damien Hirst and Jeff Koons at the Newport Street Gallery, London.
Photo: Newport Street Gallery, London via Facebook

Damien Hirst equated money to “love and death” insisting that it is “something you need to respect,” and that “you can’t make art without somehow taking it on board.”

Speaking to the BBC in a joint interview with Jeff Koons ahead of the American artist’s exhibition at Hirst’s Newport Street Gallery, in Vauxhall, south London, the bad boy of British art addressed a question on whether money obscured artistic creation.

“I think a lot of people think that artists need to be poor, or that you can’t have a focus on money,” he said. “When I did my auction, when I made all that money, it changed everything for me and it was made in such a short period of time.” Read More

How Richard Serra Shaped the Discourse about Public Art in the 20th Century

By | Architecture, Art Advisory, Art and Design, Art Collections, Art Market, Artists

d7hftxdivxxvm-1.cloudfront.netIn 1966-67, Serra penned a list of transitive verbs—a to-do list of sorts—published in The New Avant-Garde: Issues for the Art of the Seventies (1972) by Grégoire MüllerMany of these words describe the dynamics of some of Serra’s most important sculptures. To Lift, for instance, is the title of a 1967 work, one that manifests the effect of that action on a piece of vulcanized rubber. “To prop” indicates the gesture behind any number of works from that period, from Prop (1968) to 1-1-1-1 (1969) to Melnikov(1987). Even works with less explicitly action-based titles, like the 2006 masterpiece Band, evoke many of the spatial and temporal terms on that list: to bend, to shave, to flow, to suspend, to gather.

The looming gravity of these works is key to appreciating Serra’s oeuvre. The artist had a recurring dream as a child—of a mass of great ships floating on the San Francisco Bay. Thus the macho, aggressive feel of sculptures like Backdoor Pipeline (2010)—in a style that has been called “he-man Minimalism”—can also be understood as a way to shed or float above the burdens of Modernism. Rather than prompting you to simply observe, Serra makes you constantly renegotiate your relationship to an artwork that requires not only an artist, but also engineers, forgers, construction workers, preparators, curators, and viewers to participate. “How the work alters a given site is the issue,” he affirms, “not the persona of the author.” Read More

Five Questions You Should Ask Before Buying Art

By | Art Advisory, Art and Design, Art Auctions, Art Collections, Art Market, Artists

It’s easy to walk into a gallery and swoon at the sight of a work of art, but making the decision to buy it is complex. We asked an art consultant, a conservator, an attorney and an adjuster for the important issues to consider before making such a big purchase.

Question 1: Is it True Love or an Infatuation?

Even experienced collectors have made mistakes, so it’s a good idea to take a little time to ponder your reaction. You may want to consider how it fits into your existing collection; how and where you would display it; and if your gut tells you that the price is in keeping with the value of this particular artwork.

Annelien Bruins of Tang Art Advisory offers her clients a professional’s perspective without revealing her personal responses to the work of art.

“My job is to give them my professional opinion on the quality of the work they are considering buying. For example, an artist may have a number of works available but there may be only one or two that I think are worth buying—because the composition is better, the technique is better applied, it is more representative of the artist’s work, and the price is more appropriate.”

He recommends a “test run” with a work of art as a hedge against buyer’s remorse. Many galleries will allow you to take a work of art home for a few weeks. This is a good option before a major purchase. It will give you a chance to experience the work and determine if it’s true love or a passing fancy. Read More

Review: How the West Was Weird

By | Art and Design, Art Collections, Art Market, Artists, Exhibitions, News, Shows

wrongmove, giclee on canvas, 12 x 20 feet

By .  The following review appears in the March 17, 2016 issue of The Reno News and Review.

“I’m upending a story that wasn’t true and never happened,” said Tom Judd.

He believes that the West, the frontier, and the stories that surround it are part of a mythology that’s worth a more cynical look. In Home on the Range, now showing at Stremmel Gallery, the Philadelphia-based artist subverts one vintage perspective (the myth of the frontier) with another (painting). The resulting work is sad, funny and, above all, weird.

“One of the reasons the story of the West is so weird is because people are so weird,” said Judd in a recent phone interview. “They make up weird stuff and then pretend like it’s real.”

Displacing Native Americans and calling it settlement, going to war with Mexico under the guise of annexation, killing the buffalo and piling their bones in a giant heap of hubris. While domestic policy driven by manifest destiny is thought to be a thing of the past, it’s hard to deny the appeal that the quiet cowboy holds for our national character, even today. Read More

ART WORD – Humans Evolved to Be Moved By Art

By | Artists
View of a busy art fair, from Wikimedia Commons, copyright Fiona E. Campbell

View of a busy art fair, from Wikimedia Commons, copyright Fiona E. Campbell

 

Published by Smithsonian.com

There’s a lot going on in the brain of a person experiencing a painting, movie or other piece of art. But it doesn’t matter whether the art in question is aesthetically pleasing: in fact, sometimes that’s why art is enjoyable. Now, writes Jessica Herrington for SciArt in America, researchers have found evidence that humans evolved to be moved by art — whether they like it or not.

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QUICK READ – 6 Things We Learned From the World’s Most Famous Works

By | Artists

By Christie Chu for artnet News

Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (1503–1517).  Photo: via Wikipedia Commons.

Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa (1503–1517).
Photo: via Wikipedia Commons.

1. The artist’s mystique is as valuable as his technique.

Technique and style count, but mystique is the third crucial component. The most famous artworks of all time all had a bit of intrigue in them. Was the Mona Lisa Leonardo da Vinci in drag? Was she pregnant? Was she Leonardo’s mother and a Chinese slave? We may never know.

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ART WORD – MoMA’s Agnes Gund Decries Speculators and Art Storers

By | Art Collections, Art Market, Artists
Agnus Gund by Michael Falco for NY Times. Gund was MoMa President from 1991-2002 and is known for her philanthropy and support for the arts, especially women artists.

Agnes Gund by Michael Falco for NY Times. Gund was MoMa President from 1991-2002 and is known for her philanthropy and support for the arts, especially women artists.

Summarized by Marion Maneker for the Art Market Monitor.

Agnes Gund thinks people who don’t display their art are ‘ridiculous.’ But she doesn’t explain in this Wall Street Journal interview-cum-profile how she is able to display all 2,000 works of art that she owns herself:

Ms. Gund doesn’t believe all the hype. One of her efforts this summer is to try to figure out which contemporary artists have real staying power. “A number of us got together and asked, ‘Who is going to be in the art history books? Who is going to last?’ And I think many contemporary artists are trendy” and will be forgotten, she says. She credits the high auction prices to speculation by investors. “I think [that] parking art”—without the primary intent of displaying it—“is just ridiculous, and that’s what’s happening now.”She started collecting in the late 1960s. Now, she estimates she has about 2,000 works. One of her interests is collecting art by women, and she has been trying to get museums to do the same. […]

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Art Word – Everybody Hates The Art Market

By | Art Auctions, Art Collections, Art Market, Artists
Vincent Van Gogh's "Portrait of Dr. Gachet" and "Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers". Two paintings that were considered auction highs when they were purchased through Christies in 1990 and 1987.

Vincent Van Gogh’s “Portrait of Dr. Gachet” and “Vase with Fifteen Sunflowers”. Two paintings that were considered auction highs when they were purchased through Christies in 1990 and 1987.

By Marion Maneker for the Art Market Monitor

One of the more curious aspects of today’s art market is the way so many long-time art dealers seem to have a high level of disdain for buyers in the market. Is this merely a way to flatter their own customers by rubbishing other buyers or is it a sign of growing frustration and disenchantment?

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Artist Reception for “My Montana” on Thursday, May 21st

By | Artists, Exhibitions

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Stremmel Gallery presents My Montana featuring artists Jerry Iverson and Gordon McConnell. As McConnell has become a familiar name at Stremmel Gallery, it will be the first time Iverson is exhibiting his work in Reno. The opening reception is 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 21, 2015 and the exhibition will continue through June 30, 2015. Both the opening reception and exhibition are free to the public. RSVP to this event on Facebook.

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